Fishing for Mackerel, Atlantic Dock, 1901

Clinton Wharf Lined with Anglers who are Making Large Catches

Red Hook was feasting on mackerel, late October of 1901. A school of the fish reportedly chased by bluefish and porpoises had found their way into Atlantic Basin. Fishermen lined the piers, catching the mackerel with makeshift poles and any kind of bait. Clinton Wharf - which can be now described as the side of Atlantic Basin between PortSide NewYork's Mary A. Whalen and the NYC Ferry Dock - was one of the best fishing spots.

It was fist time in years that school of mackerel had found their way into Atlantic Basin. The basin was much larger in 1901 then it is today, a large portion of it was filled in, in the 1950s to create more space for trucks.

Full text of article:

MACKEREL IN ATLANTIC DOCK.
Clinton Wharf Lined with Anglers who are Making Large Catches

 The lower end of the Atlantic Dock is lined with fishermen today as a school of mackerel came in there on the tide last night.  As a result about every man and boy in the Twelfth Ward who heard on the arrival of the fish is angling for them along the Clinton wharf, the ends of the East and West Central piers and at the gap.  The fish run from 8 to 10 inches in length and are caught with any kind of bait.  Anything in the shape of a pole is used from slating laths upward and even drop lines are in use.

 The fish are probably part of the school that invaded the Nay Yard dock a couple of days ago; barrels of them were taken when the dry dock was pumped down.  The river boatmen say that the fish have been chased in by blue fish and that porpoises are pretty sure to be seen around the harbor in pursuit.  It is several years now since a school of mackerel came into the Atlantic Dock.  This one seems to keep to the lower end of the basin in the efforts of the fish to find an exit, as it is there the most of them are being taken.  

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 30 1901

Date:

1901

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Sources:

  • "MACKEREL IN ATLANTIC DOCK," The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 30 1901

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